Difference between revisions of "AMS Student Chapter Seminar"

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'''General Information''':  AMS Student Chapter Seminar will take place on Wednesday at 3:30 in the 9th floor lounge area. Talks should be of interest to the general math community, and generally will not run longer than 30 minutes.  Everyone is welcome to give a talk, please just sign up on this page. Alternatively we will also sign interested people up at the seminar itself.  There will generally be donut provided, although the snack may vary from week to week.
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The AMS Student Chapter Seminar (aka Donut Seminar) is an informal, graduate student seminar on a wide range of mathematical topics. The goal of the seminar is to promote community building and give graduate students an opportunity to communicate fun, accessible math to their peers in a stress-free (but not sugar-free) environment. Pastries (usually donuts) will be provided.
  
To sign up please provide your name and a title. Abstracts are welcome but optional.
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* '''When:''' Wednesdays, 3:30 PM – 4:00 PM
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* '''Where:''' Van Vleck, 9th floor lounge (unless otherwise announced)
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* '''Organizers:''' [https://people.math.wisc.edu/~ywu495/ Yandi Wu], Maya Banks
  
==Fall 2014==
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Everyone is welcome to give a talk. To sign up, please contact one of the organizers with a title and abstract. Talks are 25 minutes long and should avoid assuming significant mathematical background beyond first-year graduate courses.
  
==September 25, Vladimir Sotirov==
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The schedule of talks from past semesters can be found [[AMS Student Chapter Seminar, previous semesters|here]].
  
Title: [[Media:Compact-openTalk.pdf|The compact open topology: what is it really?]]
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== Fall 2021 ==
  
Abstract:  The compact-open topology on the space C(X,Y) of continuous functions from X to Y is mysteriously generated by declaring that for each compact subset K of X and each open subset V of Y, the continous functions f: X->Y conducting K inside V constitute an open set. In this talk, I will explain the universal property that uniquely determines the compact-open topology, and sketch a pretty constellation of little-known but elementary facts from domain theory that dispell the mystery of the compact-open topology's definition.
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=== September 29, John Cobb ===
  
==October 8, David Bruce==
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Title: Rooms on a Sphere
  
Title: Hex on the Beach
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Abstract: A classic combinatorial lemma becomes very simple to state and prove when on the surface of a sphere, leading to easy constructive proofs of some other well known theorems.
  
Abstract: The game of Hex is a two player game played on a hexagonal grid attributed in part to John Nash. (This is the game he is playing in /A Beautiful Mind./) Despite being relatively easy to pick up, and pretty hard to master, this game has surprising connections to some interesting mathematics. This talk will introduce the game of Hex, and then explore some of these connections. *As it is a lot more fun once you've actually played Hex feel free to join me at 3:00pm on the 9th floor to actually play a few games of Hex!*
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=== October 6, Karan Srivastava ===
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Title: An 'almost impossible' puzzle and group theory
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Abstract: You're given a chessboard with a randomly oriented coin on every square and a key hidden under one of them; player one knows where the key is and flips a single coin; player 2, using only the information of the new coin arrangement must determine where the key is. Is there a winning strategy? In this talk, we will explore this classic puzzle in a more generalized context, with n squares and d sided dice on every square. We'll see when the game is solvable and in doing so, see how the answer relies on group theory and the existence of certain groups.
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=== October 13, John Yin ===
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Title: TBA
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Abstract: TBA
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=== October 20, Varun Gudibanda ===
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Title: TBA
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Abstract: TBA
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=== October 27, Andrew Krenz ===
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Title: The 3-sphere via the Hopf fibration
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Abstract: The Hopf fibration is a map from $S^3$ to $S^2$.  The preimage (or fiber) of every point under this map is a copy of $S^1$. In this talk I will explain exactly how these circles “fit together” inside the 3-sphere.  Along the way we’ll discover some other interesting facts in some hands-on demonstrations using paper and scissors. If there is time I hope to also relate our new understanding of $S^3$ to some other familiar models.
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=== November 3, TBA ===
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Title: TBA
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Abstract: TBA
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=== November 10, TBA ===
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Title: TBA
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Abstract: TBA
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=== November 17, TBA ===
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Title: TBA
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Abstract: TBA
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=== November 24, TBA ===
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Title: TBA
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Abstract: TBA
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=== December 1, TBA ===
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Title: TBA
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Abstract: TBA
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=== December 8, TBA ===
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Title: TBA
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Abstract: TBA

Latest revision as of 15:39, 1 October 2021

The AMS Student Chapter Seminar (aka Donut Seminar) is an informal, graduate student seminar on a wide range of mathematical topics. The goal of the seminar is to promote community building and give graduate students an opportunity to communicate fun, accessible math to their peers in a stress-free (but not sugar-free) environment. Pastries (usually donuts) will be provided.

  • When: Wednesdays, 3:30 PM – 4:00 PM
  • Where: Van Vleck, 9th floor lounge (unless otherwise announced)
  • Organizers: Yandi Wu, Maya Banks

Everyone is welcome to give a talk. To sign up, please contact one of the organizers with a title and abstract. Talks are 25 minutes long and should avoid assuming significant mathematical background beyond first-year graduate courses.

The schedule of talks from past semesters can be found here.

Fall 2021

September 29, John Cobb

Title: Rooms on a Sphere

Abstract: A classic combinatorial lemma becomes very simple to state and prove when on the surface of a sphere, leading to easy constructive proofs of some other well known theorems.

October 6, Karan Srivastava

Title: An 'almost impossible' puzzle and group theory

Abstract: You're given a chessboard with a randomly oriented coin on every square and a key hidden under one of them; player one knows where the key is and flips a single coin; player 2, using only the information of the new coin arrangement must determine where the key is. Is there a winning strategy? In this talk, we will explore this classic puzzle in a more generalized context, with n squares and d sided dice on every square. We'll see when the game is solvable and in doing so, see how the answer relies on group theory and the existence of certain groups.

October 13, John Yin

Title: TBA

Abstract: TBA

October 20, Varun Gudibanda

Title: TBA

Abstract: TBA

October 27, Andrew Krenz

Title: The 3-sphere via the Hopf fibration

Abstract: The Hopf fibration is a map from $S^3$ to $S^2$. The preimage (or fiber) of every point under this map is a copy of $S^1$. In this talk I will explain exactly how these circles “fit together” inside the 3-sphere. Along the way we’ll discover some other interesting facts in some hands-on demonstrations using paper and scissors. If there is time I hope to also relate our new understanding of $S^3$ to some other familiar models.


November 3, TBA

Title: TBA

Abstract: TBA

November 10, TBA

Title: TBA

Abstract: TBA

November 17, TBA

Title: TBA

Abstract: TBA

November 24, TBA

Title: TBA

Abstract: TBA

December 1, TBA

Title: TBA

Abstract: TBA

December 8, TBA

Title: TBA

Abstract: TBA