Difference between revisions of "Graduate Logic Seminar"

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The Graduate Logic Seminar is an informal space where graduate students and professors present topics related to logic which are not necessarily original or completed work. This is a space focused principally on practicing presentation skills or learning materials that are not usually presented in a class.
 
The Graduate Logic Seminar is an informal space where graduate students and professors present topics related to logic which are not necessarily original or completed work. This is a space focused principally on practicing presentation skills or learning materials that are not usually presented in a class.
  
* '''When:''' Tuesdays 4-5 PM
+
* '''When:''' Mondays 3:30-4:30 PM
* '''Where:''' Van Vleck 901
+
* '''Where:''' Van Vleck B139
* '''Organizers:''' [https://www.math.wisc.edu/~jgoh/ Jun Le Goh]
+
* '''Organizers:''' Karthik Ravishankar and [https://sites.google.com/wisc.edu/antonio Antonio Nakid Cordero]
  
 
The talk schedule is arranged at the beginning of each semester. If you would like to participate, please contact one of the organizers.
 
The talk schedule is arranged at the beginning of each semester. If you would like to participate, please contact one of the organizers.
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Sign up for the graduate logic seminar mailing list:  join-grad-logic-sem@lists.wisc.edu
 
Sign up for the graduate logic seminar mailing list:  join-grad-logic-sem@lists.wisc.edu
  
== Fall 2021 tentative schedule ==
+
== Fall 2022 ==
  
To see what's happening in the Logic qual preparation sessions click [[Logic Qual Prep|here]].
+
=== September 12 - Organizational Meeting ===
  
=== September 14 - organizational meeting ===
+
We will meet to assign speakers to dates.
  
We met to discuss the schedule.
+
=== '''September 19 - Karthik Ravishankar''' ===
 +
'''Title:''' Lowness for Isomorphism
  
=== September 28 - Ouyang Xiating ===
+
'''Abstract:''' A Turing degree is said to be low for isomorphism if it can only compute an isomorphism between computable structures only when a computable isomorphism already exists. In this talk, we show that the measure of the class of low for isomorphism sets in Cantor space is 0 and that no Martin Lof random is low for isomorphism.
  
=== October 12 - Karthik Ravishankar ===
+
=== '''September 26 - Antonio Nakid Cordero''' ===
 +
'''Title:''' When Models became Polish: an introduction to the Topological Vaught Conjecture
  
=== October 26 - Alice Vidrine ===
+
'''Abstract:''' Vaught's Conjecture, originally asked by Vaught in 1961, is one of the most (in)famous open problems in mathematical logic. The conjecture is that a complete theory on a countable language must either have countably-many or continuum-many non-isomorphic models. In this talk, we will discuss some of the main ideas that surround this conjecture, with special emphasis on a topological generalization in terms of the continuous actions of Polish groups.
  
=== November 9 - Antonio Nákid Cordero ===
+
=== '''October 3 - Yunting Zhang''' ===
  
=== November 23 - open slot ===
+
=== '''October 10 - Yuxiao Fu''' ===
  
=== December 7 - open slot ===
+
=== '''October 17 - Alice Vidrine''' ===
 +
 
 +
=== '''October 24 - Hongyu Zhu''' ===
 +
 
 +
=== '''October 31 - Break for Halloween''' ===
 +
 
 +
=== '''November 7 - John Spoerl''' ===
 +
 
 +
=== '''November 14 - Josiah Jacobsen-Grocott''' ===
 +
 
 +
=== '''November 21 - Karthik Ravishankar''' ===
 +
 
 +
=== '''November 28 - Logan Heath''' ===
 +
 
 +
=== '''December 5 - Logan Heath''' ===
 +
 
 +
=== '''December 12 - TBA''' ===
  
 
== Previous Years ==
 
== Previous Years ==
  
 
The schedule of talks from past semesters can be found [[Graduate Logic Seminar, previous semesters|here]].
 
The schedule of talks from past semesters can be found [[Graduate Logic Seminar, previous semesters|here]].

Revision as of 01:20, 26 September 2022

The Graduate Logic Seminar is an informal space where graduate students and professors present topics related to logic which are not necessarily original or completed work. This is a space focused principally on practicing presentation skills or learning materials that are not usually presented in a class.

  • When: Mondays 3:30-4:30 PM
  • Where: Van Vleck B139
  • Organizers: Karthik Ravishankar and Antonio Nakid Cordero

The talk schedule is arranged at the beginning of each semester. If you would like to participate, please contact one of the organizers.

Sign up for the graduate logic seminar mailing list: join-grad-logic-sem@lists.wisc.edu

Fall 2022

September 12 - Organizational Meeting

We will meet to assign speakers to dates.

September 19 - Karthik Ravishankar

Title: Lowness for Isomorphism

Abstract: A Turing degree is said to be low for isomorphism if it can only compute an isomorphism between computable structures only when a computable isomorphism already exists. In this talk, we show that the measure of the class of low for isomorphism sets in Cantor space is 0 and that no Martin Lof random is low for isomorphism.

September 26 - Antonio Nakid Cordero

Title: When Models became Polish: an introduction to the Topological Vaught Conjecture

Abstract: Vaught's Conjecture, originally asked by Vaught in 1961, is one of the most (in)famous open problems in mathematical logic. The conjecture is that a complete theory on a countable language must either have countably-many or continuum-many non-isomorphic models. In this talk, we will discuss some of the main ideas that surround this conjecture, with special emphasis on a topological generalization in terms of the continuous actions of Polish groups.

October 3 - Yunting Zhang

October 10 - Yuxiao Fu

October 17 - Alice Vidrine

October 24 - Hongyu Zhu

October 31 - Break for Halloween

November 7 - John Spoerl

November 14 - Josiah Jacobsen-Grocott

November 21 - Karthik Ravishankar

November 28 - Logan Heath

December 5 - Logan Heath

December 12 - TBA

Previous Years

The schedule of talks from past semesters can be found here.